Satellite Safari Feature Gallery

This page contains a gallery of screen shots from Satellite Safari. It's a guided tour of the app, which illustrates its main features and what you can do with them. You can click on any image below for a full-size, high-resolution version.

Left: The Orbit view shows where your satellite is orbiting over Earth using a 3D model of the globe. You can swipe the screen to center different parts of the globe. You can pinch the screen to zoom in or out.

Above: The Sky view shows the satellites that are visible in the sky from your location on the Earth's surface. You can swipe the screen to center different parts of the sky. You can pinch the screen to zoom in or out.

Sky view shows the horizon, and the ground under your feet, as a panoramic view around a lake. The cardinal directions along the horizon are marked. At night, the lake becomes translucent, so you can see the stars, planets, and satellites that are orbiting "under your feet", over the other side of the world. You can turn off daylight to make the lake permanently translucent, or remove the lake horizon panorama completely, in the Settings.

Above: The Ground Track view shows where your satellite is orbiting over Earth using a 2D map of the world. You can swipe the map to center different parts of the world. You can pinch the map to zoom in or out.

The map shows the position, name, and orbit of the satellite that you have selected from the Search view. The satellite's orbit is shown as a green line wrapping around the Earth. The satellite's visibility circle is also shown around the satellite. The satellite will be visible above the horizon from any part of the world inside the visibility circle.

Right: The Satellite view shows a "bird's eye view" from your selected satellite. It displays the Earth from orbit, exactly as your satellite sees it! You can swipe the screen to center different parts of the view. You can pinch the screen to zoom in or out.

For many satellites, a 3D model of the satellite accurately shows the satellite itself. For other objects, a "generic" satellite model or rocket booster is shown instead.

iPad and Tablet Support

Satellite Safari is universal for both iPhone and iPad. The Android version of Satellite Safari supports Android tablets as well as phones. Feature-wise, Satellite Safari is identical on either kind of device, but takes advantage of tablet screens to present information in a larger layout. Here are some screen shots of Satellite Safari on an iPad. You can click on any image below for a full-size, high-resolution version.

Above: By default, the Orbit view only shows a single satellite is shown. To see more than one satellite, turn on the Show All Satellites option in the Settings. When this is turned on, you can tap a different satellite in the view to select it.

The Earth's night side is shaded; as time flows, the shaded part of the globe changes as the Earth turns. You can turn off shading with the Show Day and Night option in the Settings. You can also show cities on the globe, and atmosphere (clouds) by turning on these options in the Settings as well.

Right: The Info view shows information about your selected satellite, and the times when it will pass over your location. You can set alarms for satellite passes, to alert yourself when a satellite pass is about to take place in real time. For hundreds of the brightest and best-known satellites, the Info view also displays English-language descriptions and images of the spacecraft.

Due to varying atmospheric conditions and orbital perturbations, pass times should only be considered accurate to about one minute.

Left: By default, Sky view only shows one satellite - the one you have selected. To see more than one satellite, turn on the Show All Satellites option in the Settings. With this turned on, you can tap a different satellite in the Sky view to select it.

You can animate the Sky view to see how satellites move across the sky as time flows. To do this, tap the Time button in the toolbar. To keep your satellite centered on the map as it moves, tap the Center button. See the Time and Center help sections for more information.

Above: Unlike Orbit view, you can see the entire Earth at once in Ground Track view. But you cannot get a sense of the satellite's altitude above our home planet. You can do this in Orbit view, which shows the satellite's orbit in 3D.

The night side of the world is shaded on the map; as time flows, the shaded part of the map changes. You can turn off shading with the Show Day and Night option in the Settings. You can also show cities on the map, and atmosphere (clouds) by turning on these options in the Settings as well.